Community Public Discussion

topic of discussion

I need some authentic blues techniques for my guitar solos!

2
Posted 2013-11-20T07:43:12.0Z by JP12,895
  • V.I.P.
  • Teacher

I'm an advanced lead guitar player, so I know a bunch of standard blues licks and a few turnarounds, but I don't think I ever sound like a real blues guitarist. I want to be able to throw some authentic blues techniques into my leads that I can play around with to discover some new sounds.

Does anyone have any favorite techniques that they would be willing to share?

Comments:

Replies

Date | Votes
Reply — Posted 2013-11-20T18:34:06.0Z
3
JP12,895
  • V.I.P.
  • Teacher

I'm looking for more advanced techniques, but I had to share this video because it's AWESOME!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHtPYZRVeGI

Comments:

  • I find it funny that the only guy in ZZ Top without a beard is named Frank Beard.Jeff E 2013-11-20T21:10:25.0Z
    0
Reply — Posted 2013-11-22T17:31:25.0Z (edited 2013-11-24T18:52:13.0Z)
2
Jeff E13,406
  • V.I.P.
  • Teacher

I think it's key to define to yourself what it means to be a blues player. without getting into the old "what is the blues?" conundrum. Obviously Robben Ford and Mississippi John Hurt are pretty drastically different, but there are common threads there. One really important recurring theme when you listen to most great players talking about the Blues, and one you see in the vid you posted of Billy Gibbons, is that most great Blues players have a strong sense of the stylistic history of the form. 

So...If you want to play Blues music, listen to Blues music. Dig into the old recordings chronologically.  Start with Son House. Then hear what Robert Johnson did with it. What happened when the Blues migrated north to Chicago and changed from a rural acoustic form into an electric urban music. Listen to Elmore James. 

Image

It's been a while but I remember this being a great book about the roots of the Blues, and history of the early players.

Next trace the different branches of the Blues. Piedmont Blues, Texas Blues, Jump Blues..What was the impact of the Blues on Jazz and Rock.

I don't think you have to be a historian of the Blues to be a player, but you do need to have a sense of where it came from and what you want to do with it. 

 

 

Comments:

  • This is true... listening is important and you can get a lot out of it. I'm looking for some licks and tricks. The kind of stuff that an old bluesman would show you on his porch drinking lemonaid. Thanks for the suggestion though!JP 2013-11-22T18:01:40.0Z
    0
Reply — Posted 2013-12-02T18:04:45.0Z (edited 2013-12-02T18:05:25.0Z)
1
Joe S11

Check out this video:

http://youtu.be/00XMz_1TFi4

Try this... Little Milton: no distortion, no tricks, bells & whistles. But whats he REALLY doing? Cop 1 lick...something simple. That is the blues, strip it down first. Why does he sound just as cool as BB without the wild tone? Skip james & the delta stuff... Go rite to Chis Cain=he's not doing robben ford, its accessable but why not listen to Larry Carlton just for FEEL too & then cop a Duke Robbilard riff (dukes mood) Compare the vibrato of luther allison (coiled &focused) vs. say, bb or clapton. Ah yes technique rite there which defines & makes a player unique... but decide which path u want & persue that. Why did jimmie vaughan play simple while srv swung for the fences? Who are u & what do u wanna say? Watch my friend dave workman play "backstroke" on utube--he copped collins but plays his own style/ no doubt that helped him & it prolly took alot of study to figure that stuff out. What about just getting a vibrato pedal & jamming to Robert Ward? Maybe...ok thats enuf 4 now.

Comments:

Reply — Posted 2014-05-02T04:24:31.0Z
0
JP12,895
  • V.I.P.
  • Teacher

Here's a great video that shows some simple licks for starting a blues solo:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YgzUyNIegPA#t=766

Comments:

Reply — Posted 2014-05-17T01:30:30.0Z
0
Jeremy C1,551
  • V.I.P.
  • Teacher

Post a reply to the overall discussion. You can also leave a comment for any post above by clicking on an "Add Comment" button.

Comments:

Reply — Posted 2014-05-17T02:09:29.0Z
1
Jeremy C1,551
  • V.I.P.
  • Teacher

I've always had a "Less is more" approach to playing the blues. I wanted it to be more about feeling than playing a lot of notes. Stevie Ray's "Texas Flood" solos come to mind. The mileage he gets out of bending one single note is incredible. Buddy Guy also comes to mind. This video of SRV from Japan, with just the trio, should show you what I mean.

http://youtu.be/s9YBGaozZW0

 

Comments:

  • Cool Jeremy... this is one of my favorite albums. I think I need to dive into where Stevie learned his stuff. Another one of my favorites is the studio live album by Stevie Ray Vaughan and Albert King - Don't Lie To Me. Check it out - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZB57b3lPQEJP 2014-05-17T02:15:38.0Z
    1

This is a public discussion forum. Any member can post a reply or a comment.

Discuss Music

Community Public Forum

This public discussion forum is being moderated by MusicLessons.com.

Thread Information

  • 908
  • 2013-11-20T07:43:12.0Z
  • 2014-05-17T02:15:38.0Z

  • Community Public Forum

  • Blues,Guitar,Lead Playing,Solo

You are not subscribed.

Related Questions & Discussions:

Awesome Videos

Wednesday February 28, 2018

A wonderful Acapella Tribute to Bob Marley - Could You Be Loved

What an amazing to watch, beautiful tribute to Bob! This awesome a capella version of Bob Marley's 'Could You Be Loved' was made by Israeli musicians in honor of what would have been the late Marley's 70th Birthday. - Open Video

Your message was sent!

The tag was not found in our tag library.

Earn 20 points if the tag is accepted into our public tag library for everyone to use. You can start using it now by submitting this form.

Only suggest tags that you think are useful for searching and are relevant to the subject of music.

Important: If your suggestion is considered to be offensive or SPAM, you will lose points and/or be prevented from doing anything on this site.